This picture hit the national media this week.This picture hit the national media this week.
You may or may not agree with this Dad’s tactics to get his son’s attention, however, he is correct about the importance of academics before sports.
In fact, the NCAA has recently increased the academic requirements for a student-athlete to be eligible to play their sport.
The hardest thing I had to do when I worked on campus was tell an athlete they weren’t eligible to play their sport because they hadn’t met the core course requirements for eligibility!
This is why we created Informed Athlete’s Freshman Eligibility & Transcript Review service so we can help high school athletes and parents be better informed and prepared without unpleasant surprises!

With a Freshman Eligibility and Transcript Review, we will:

  • Explain the freshman eligibility requirements and how they affect your athlete.
  • Compare the courses completed with the courses approved by the NCAA Eligibility Center.
  • Provide a written assessment of the subjects that need to be completed to satisfy initial eligibility requirements.
  • Review your ACT or SAT test scores, and determine the GPA that will be needed for eligibility, and
  • Suggest steps and discuss a plan of action that may be available to satisfy the eligibility requirements.

For more information, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com

If your athlete is being recruited by an NAIA college, it’s important to know that there are few standard regulations that are imposed on all NAIA colleges across the country regarding the awarding of athletic scholarships

What does this mean for you?

– Any policies addressing the awarding or cancellation of an NAIA athletic scholarship are determined by each individual college.

– Unlike the NCAA rules, the NAIA rules do not include provisions that prevent a coach from taking an athlete’s scholarship for medical reasons or that require the opportunity for an appeal hearing if a coach wants to cancel an athlete’s scholarship.

– The NAIA financial aid guidelines only speak to the fees and other charges that can be covered by an NAIA college when providing a scholarship.  They do not include such points as a date when an athlete must be informed if their scholarship is not being renewed for the following year, or the conditions under which a coach can cancel an athlete’s scholarship in the middle of the academic year.

Be sure that you ask the coach about his or her scholarship policies (and those of the athletic department) and review written college policies regarding NAIA athletic scholarships when considering an NAIA school.

If you have questions about NAIA athletic scholarships, contact us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

NCAA athletes, coaches, and athletic staff members are prohibited from participating in ANY sports wagering activity, AND are prohibited from providing information to individuals involved in any gambling activity (such as telling a friend or classmate that a point guard or pitcher is injured and won’t be completely healthy in an upcoming game).

The NCAA defines a “wager” as a person agreeing to give up an item of value (entry fee, a shirt, a dinner) in exchange for the opportunity to receive another item of value, so even a bet over a meal or a t-shirt would be a violation of NCAA gambling legislation.

With the NCAA “Final Four” tournament bracket being revealed on Selection Sunday, athletes may be tempted to participate in a “pool” to fill out their tournament bracket. 

This is only possible
if they do so for bragging rights alone,
and no “item of value” is involved. 

In fact, I recall a few years ago when a college golfer was suspended because he participated in a “pool” with his father and his father’s golfing buddies.  When the athlete’s father posted on his Facebook page that his son had won the pool, athletic administrators at his school learned of the post, and the athlete was suspended.

Also, just within the last two weeks, five University of Richmond baseball players were suspended for their involvement in a fantasy football league.  They are ineligible for competition until the NCAA reviews and completes the eligibility reinstatement process.

If you have questions regarding NCAA rules on gambling and how they apply to student-athletes, contact us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com 

 

I recently talked to the dad of an athlete who had withdrawn from her university (where she had an athletic scholarship) because the coursework got to be too much for her and she was struggling in her classes.

He told me his daughter was diagnosed with an education-impacting disability (or learning disability) in high school and did well academically at that level with proper accommodations.  However, during the college recruiting process, they did not inform the coaches about her need for assistance.

This is very common because athletes and sometimes their parents think it makes them look weak and therefore, don’t want to share such information with a college coach.  You can imagine what their reasoning is:

  • Will the coach view me differently because of my disability?
  • Will they withdraw their scholarship offer?
  • Will they try to force me to transfer to another college after I’m already a member of their team?

It’s understandable that families wrestle with such questions. But if you’re in this situation or know of someone who is, here are a couple of things to consider.

  • When making a campus visit, be sure to stop in or, better yet, schedule time with the Academic and Student Support Services offices to ask about services offered for learning disabilities.
  • Be honest and up front with the coaching staff during the recruiting process.  While you might find out that, yes, they do appear to be showing reduced interest and might withdraw their scholarship offer, would it not be better to find out the character of the coaches and their true concern for your athlete during the recruiting process rather than after the athlete has started their college career at that college?

If you have questions regarding recruiting visits and how to approach a coach about potential accommodations for learning disabilities and other recruiting issues, call Informed Athlete at 913-766-1235 to schedule a consult.  All consultations are private and confidential.