Spring-sport athletes (and their parents) on Division III teams should keep in mind that the “redshirt” rule is quite different for Division III than it is for NCAA Division I and II athletes.

NCAA Division I and II athletes can practice with their team all the way through the end of the season, and as long as they do not appear in an actual game representing their university against another team, that will be considered a “redshirt” year for that athlete because they didn’t compete against another team.

However, NCAA Division III athletes will use one of their four “seasons of participation” if they practice with their team after the first game of the season – even if they never appear in an actual game against another team.

This happened to a client of ours last year.  The athlete’s father contacted us to ask about his son’s redshirt season because he had left the team after just one week of the season.  However, since he had practiced with the team after the start of the season, he was still charged with a “season of participation” for that season, and had three seasons remaining rather than the four that the father thought he had.
For a consultation regarding the redshirt rules and guidelines, send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call us at 913-766-1235.

Even though the SAT changed their test and scoring system back in 2016, the NCAA Division I Sliding Scale – which is used to determine freshman eligibility for competition, practice and athletic scholarships – has NOT been updated to reflect the new SAT scores. 

This has been causing confusion for some high school athletes and parents, as well as some of the coaches and guidance counselors whom those athletes and families look to for assistance.

Call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com if you have questions about NCAA eligibility requirements or would like to request an NCAA Eligibility and Transcript Review. 

 

From the emails and the phone calls we receive, there is a lot of interest in the possibility of NCAA Division I transfer rule changes– especially in the sports of baseball, basketball, football and men’s ice hockey where athletes are often required to serve a “year in residence” at their new university before they can represent their new school in competition.

At the current time, the only proposed change in the NCAA Division I transfer rules is one that would eliminate the requirement that an athlete must receive “permission to contact” from their current university before coaches at other universities could speak with the athlete or his/her family or representative regarding a possible transfer.

The change – if approved – would result in the athlete only being required to provide written “notification of transfer” to their university that they are planning to transfer and then their name would be added to a database of transferring athletes.  Once an athlete’s name is added to the database (to be managed by the NCAA) coaches at other universities could contact them regarding a transfer.

The earliest date for this proposed change to be voted on is in April but could be delayed until June so that other transfer rule changes can be voted on as a “package.”

There is no proposed change “in the mix” at this time regarding immediate eligibility for a transferring athlete in the specific sports named above.  We’ll have updates in future newsletters when there are new developments regarding transfers.

In the meantime, if you want to be proactive and prepared for a possible transfer, contact us for a consultation at rick@informedathlete.com or 913-766-1235. 

Last week at the annual NCAA Convention in Indianapolis, proposed rule changes were voted on by Division I, II, and III representatives.

Here’s a brief summary of some of the rule changes most important to student-athletes and their families.

**NCAA Division I “Power Five” universities will be required, effective August 1, 2018, to provide student-athletes with medical care for athletically-related injuries for at least two years after an athlete graduates or leaves their university.  Each university will have the discretion to determine whether an injury is athletically-related, how it will provide the medical care, and to establish policies for implementing the medical care.

**NCAA Division I universities that are not in the “Power Five” group will have the option to follow the same rule but will not be required to do so.

**“Power Five” universities also voted to allow men’s ice hockey athletes who have not yet attended college to be represented by an agent if they are drafted by a professional ice hockey team.  This rule change is effective immediately.

Hockey athletes using an agent will be required to pay the agent the going rate for their services and to terminate the agreement with the agent prior to full-time collegiate enrollment if the athlete does not sign a contract with the professional team.  This same rule was approved for high school baseball recruits drafted by a professional team two years ago.

**Rule changes regarding recruiting by NCAA Division I coaches were approved at the committee level to move forward through the NCAA legislative process but won’t be voted on until April 2018 at the earliest.

These proposals will restrict recruits in all sports other than basketball and football from making unofficial visits prior to Sept. 1 of their junior year of high school BUT at the same time will allow Division I programs to provide official visits to recruits as early as Sept. 1 of their junior year.

**NCAA Division II proposals were limited to the starting dates for football and volleyball seasons, revising the penalties for sports gambling by athletes and coaches, and allowing universities in Mexico to apply for membership in the NCAA.

**Students who graduate from an NCAA Division III college will be allowed to compete as a graduate student (or one seeking a second undergraduate degree) at a different Division III college, as long as the student has eligibility remaining.

If you have questions about NCAA rules, contact us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

So, your NCAA DI coach was fired or resigned – how does this affect your athletic scholarship?  There is a new Division I rule for an athletic scholarship after the departure of a head coach.

In that situation, it often happens that a new coach will cut players from the team or will tell them that “you can continue on the team, but don’t expect to get much playing time” in an effort to coerce them to transfer.

For a student-athlete who may want to stay at the same school on scholarship to finish their degree and graduate from that university, there is a new rule that allows them to stay on scholarship the following year(s) and that scholarship will not count against team limits.

HOWEVER, the downside to this new rule is that for the scholarship to NOT count against team limits, the athlete must give up participation in their sport.

If you are an NCAA Division I student-athlete whose coach has been fired or resigned, and you have not been informed about this new rule, contact us for a consultation to discuss scholarship strategies.