Scholarship student-athletes (in sports other than baseball, basketball, football, and men’s ice hockey) who wish to transfer to an NCAA Division I program and be immediately eligible at their new school must meet two conditions:

  • The athlete must be academically eligible at the school they are transferring from.
  • The athletic department your athlete is leaving must not have an objection to the transfer.

A common question from many parents we have consulted with has been “How will my athlete know whether their school is filing an objection?”

And my answer has been that the school is required to provide an appeal opportunity. But until now, there has not been a clear answer as to how the student-athlete officially learns whether their previous school has approved or denied their request.

NCAA DI Schools Must Now Provide Written Notification to the Student-Athlete

At the recent NCAA Rules Seminar, it was explained that NCAA Division I athletic programs that have an objection to a student-athlete using the One-Time Transfer Exception are now required to provide written notification directly to the student-athlete and that they have the right to an appeal hearing when their original school objects to the transfer.

This is a very positive change because these transfer notification forms are entered into the Transfer Portal which is not accessible to student-athletes. Previously, student-athletes were sometimes blindsided by finding out late in the transfer process that their school was objecting to their transfer.

Do you Have Questions?

If you need personal assistance, schedule a confidential transfer consultation online or call us at 913-766-1235.

The NCAA’s DI transfer rule change will help qualified DI non-scholarship student-athletes to be immediately eligible in their first season at a new university.

At the recent NCAA Rules Seminar in Indianapolis, I got additional clarification which I’m sharing in this blog post.

Walk-on/Non-recruited Transfer Exceptions

An athlete transferring to a Division I university next Fall as an undergraduate will have the chance to be immediately eligible if:

  • The athlete’s previous four-year college provided athletic scholarships in their sport, but the athlete has not received an athletic scholarship, OR
  • The athlete’s previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, and the athlete was not “recruited” by the previous four-year college.

There is one aspect of this change that has NOT received much publicity at all, but is one that has previously been a concern for many of our clients:

The university these athletes will be leaving WILL NOT BE ABLE TO OBJECT to the athlete being immediately eligible next year at their new university.

However, it IS necessary to be academically eligible at the time you leave your previous university in order to receive an athletic scholarship in your first year at a new Division I university.

Do you have questions?

If you have questions about the changes to the NCAA Division I transfer rules, contact us at 913-766-1235 or via e-mail at rick@informedathlete.com

If you’re a current scholarship athlete at an NCAA university, have you been informed what your scholarship status is for next year?

If you have not been informed whether your athletic scholarship will remain as is, be reduced, or not renewed, I strongly encourage you to ask your coach NOW!

While NCAA athletic departments have until July 1st to notify you, most coaches and athletic programs don’t wait that long.  They usually inform athletes at the end of the school year before they leave campus for the summer, if not earlier.

Waiting until July 1 to find out that your scholarship has been reduced or cancelled, and then going through the appeal process will leave very little time to find another college to transfer to if that becomes necessary.

Do you Need Help?

If you have questions about your scholarship status and options available to you if your scholarship has been cancelled or reduced, we can help.  Schedule a confidential scholarship strategies consult online.  Or, If you prefer, call our office at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com

If you are a college athlete who is going to take summer courses from a college or university other than the one you were enrolled this spring, you should keep these points in mind.

If you are taking the summer course to gain additional credit hours toward your degree requirements:

Check with your academic advisor to confirm that the course can be transferred back to your current college or university and will count toward your degree requirements.

If you are taking the summer course to improve your GPA:

Call the Office of the Registrar at your college or university to ask whether the summer course will impact your GPA, or whether it will only impact the credit hours you need for your degree. Such policies can vary from one college to another.

Do you have questions?

Give Informed Athlete® a call at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com if you have questions about this information or other eligibility issues.

As spring sport seasons wind down, a hot topic among players and parents is what will be discussed in the Exit Meeting with the coaching staff.

What happens in an Exit Meeting?

An Exit meeting is the time where each player meets with the coaching staff (in my experience, the head coach, but may differ for other teams) to summarize the year as well as give an overall outlook at the individual’s future with the program moving forward.

For some players, the exit meetings may be nothing but a mere formality, a simple goodbye to the coach and see you next fall.

But for others, the exit meeting may be a major factor in what a young player, and his/her family wants to do for the upcoming school year.

Preparing for an Exit Meeting

In approaching these meetings, there are many different questions that should be asked depending on the situation that a particular student-athlete is in (freshman vs. junior, pitcher vs. position player, and starter vs. bench player).

I strongly recommend that each athlete should make sure there are no unknowns left on the table at the conclusion of their exit meeting. Speaking as an athlete who did not get all questions clarified, and paid for it later, I believe this is the overall priority with each exit meeting.

Questions to Ask in an Exit Meeting

As a former student-athlete, I know that all of us have many questions regarding what our future holds at a particular university.

  • Do I still have a chance to contribute?
  • Is there any chance I could be cut at fall semester?
  • Will my scholarship be renewed for the coming year?

There are many uncertainties that each player has. There could even be some uncertainties within the coaching staff that may keep them from providing answers to a player or parent’s satisfaction.

Best-Possible Outcome from an Exit Meeting

At the end of the day, each athlete wants to receive an honest and thorough evaluation to give them the best opportunity at success. By getting as many questions answered as possible, the student-athlete puts him/herself in a better position to make an informed decision about their future.

Do you need advice?

If you or your student-athlete needs assistance preparing for their exit meeting or would like to discuss options if the exit meeting doesn’t go as hoped, give us a call at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathete.com to schedule a confidential consultation.

As of August 1, 2019, these NCAA DI Transfer Rules will go into effect:

Walk-on/Non-Recruited Transfer Exceptions

A student-athlete transferring to a Division I university next Fall as an undergraduate can possibly be immediately eligible if:

  • Their previous four-year college provided athletic scholarships in their sport, but the athlete has not received an athletic scholarship, OR
  • Their previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, and the athlete was not “recruited” by that college.

Student-Athletes in position to benefit from this change will still need to be academically eligible at their new university.

Also, while these changes have received lots of publicity in social media, there is one aspect of this change that has NOT received much publicity at all.

The university that these athletes are transferring from WILL NOT be allowed to object to the athlete being immediately eligible next year at their new university (a condition of the One-Time Transfer Exception which I have shared with many of our clients)!

Graduate Transfer Exception

An athlete transferring as a graduate student to an NCAA Division I university in the sports of baseball, basketball, football, and men’s ice hockey next Fall will have the chance to be immediately eligible (without need for a waiver from the NCAA) as long as:

  • The athlete’s previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, OR
  • The athlete never received athletic scholarships while enrolled at a four-year college.

Do you need assistance?

If you have questions about the NCAA transfer rules and how these changes might possibly affect your student-athlete, schedule a confidential consultation online or call us at 913-766-1235.

The NCAA Division I Management Council recently approved following recruiting rule changes.  The NCAA DI Recruiting Rule changes are effective beginning May 1, 2019:

Recruiting Calls

In most sports, the earliest date for NCAA Division I coaches to place recruiting calls to prospects was moved up from September 1st at the start of the junior year to June 15th after the sophomore year.

The exceptions are:

  • Baseball, Softball, Lacrosse and Women’s Basketball – September 1st of junior year
  • Football – September 1st of senior year except for one call between April 15-May 31st of junior year
  • Men’s Ice Hockey – January 1st of sophomore year

Incoming Calls

NCAA DI coaches in most sports can accept incoming calls from recruits on/after June 15th after the sophomore year.

The exceptions are:

  • Lacrosse and Softball – September 1st of junior year
  • Baseball, Basketball, Football and Men’s Ice Hockey – Permissible at any time

Earliest Date for Coaches to Send Recruiting Materials to Prospects

NCAA DI Coaches are now allowed to send recruiting materials via text message, emails, etc to prospects starting June 15th after sophomore year of HS. (The previous rule for most sports was September 1st of the junior year).

The exceptions are:

  • Football, Baseball, Softball, Lacrosse and Women’s Basketball – Sept. 1st of junior year
  • Men’s Ice Hockey – January 1st of sophomore year

Off-Campus Contacts

NCAA DI Coaches in many sports can now have off-campus contacts with recruits in many sports as early as August 1st at the START of the recruit’s junior year. (The previous time frame was July 1st AFTER the junior year.)

The exceptions are:

  • Baseball and Football – July 1st following completion of junior year of HS
  • Men’s Basketball – opening day of junior year of HS
  • Women’s Basketball – March 1st of junior year of HS
  • Men’s Ice Hockey – June 15th after sophomore year of HS
  • Lacrosse and Softball – September 1st of junior year of HS

Official and Unofficial Visits

The earliest date for official and unofficial visits was moved just one month earlier for most sports – from September 1st at the start of the junior year to August 1 at the start of the junior year. This rule was changed to accommodate home football, soccer or volleyball contests that occur in August.

For Official Visits, the exceptions are:

  • Baseball, Softball and Lacrosse – September 1st of junior year
  • Women’s Basketball – Thursday after Women’s Final Four during junior year
  • Football – April 1st of junior year

For Unofficial Visits with Athletic Department Involvement, the exceptions are:

  • Baseball, Softball and Lacrosse – September 1st of junior year
  • Men’s Basketball – August 1st of sophomore year
  • Football and Women’s Basketball – No restriction on earliest date

Medical Exams During Official or Unofficial Visits:

Effective May 1, 2019: During an official or unofficial visit to a Division I campus, universities will be permitted to conduct a medical exam on a prospect to determine the prospect’s “…medical qualifications to participate in intercollegiate athletics.”

The exam must be conducted by a team physician or athletic trainer. No coaches or other athletic staff members may be present.

Prospects Involved in Tournaments or Multi-Day Events:

Effective May 1, 2019 for all sports other than basketball: Prospects involved in competition (such as in a tournament or multi-day event) can have contact with NCAA Division I coaches when competition has concluded for the day. (The previous rule prohibited contact until the tournament concluded or the prospect’s team is eliminated from competition.)

Scholarship & Financial Aid

Effective August 1, 2019: Athletes can accept up to $1000 of athletically-related outside financial aid per academic year from “…established and continuing programs to aid students.”

Examples include high school booster clubs, local sports clubs, and civic clubs providing athletic recognition.

For more information

Contact us via e-mail at rick@informedathlete.com or by calling 913-766-1235 if you have questions about these rule changes or any other changes that you might have heard or read about via social media or in your local paper (if you’re “old-school” like me!!).

NCAA Division I and II football coaches will be “hitting the road” to visit high schools and junior colleges to evaluate prospects during the Spring recruiting period which started on April 15 and continues through May 31.

Evaluation Days – How many are allowed?

Division I programs are allowed up to 168 “evaluation days” selected at each coaching staff’s discretion, with each day that a coach is conducting off-campus evaluation counting as one “evaluation day.” So, seven coaches from an FBS or FCS program doing off-campus evaluation on the same day will count as using seven of their 168 “evaluation days.”

Recruiting Calls – How many are allowed?

Division I coaching staffs are permitted to make one recruiting phone call to a high school junior during this period, in addition to being able to call high school seniors not more than once per week.

When can coaches evaluate prospects?

Division II coaching staffs choose four weeks out of the six between April 15 to May 31 to evaluate prospects at high schools or junior colleges. They are permitted unlimited phone calls to high school junior or seniors.

Do you have questions?

If you have questions about the recruiting rules, contact us at 913-766-1235 or via e-mail at rick@informedathlete.com