We recently consulted with a student-athlete who transferred to an NCAA Division II university only to learn that she would not be academically eligible this year even though she earned her Associates Degree at her junior college during the summer.

  • This student-athlete had not been informed that there are multiple NCAA academic requirements that must be satisfied to be eligible when transferring from one college to another.
  • She thought that the completion of her Associates Degree was all that she needed to be eligible as a transfer.

Unfortunately, she wasn’t informed that she was also required to earn at least 9 credit hours of transferable degree credit during her last semester at the junior college.

She didn’t have enough credit hours that were accepted as transfer credit to the Division II university and therefore wasn’t eligible to compete during her first year in the Division II program.

The 9-Hour Rule is applicable to ALL NCAA DII Continuing and Transfer Athletes

In fact, any NCAA Division II athlete – even a continuing student-athlete at their same university – must earn at least 9 credit hours (or 8 if their college is on the quarter system) in the preceding term of full-time attendance to be eligible the following term.

For a transfer athlete, those credit hours must be acceptable for transfer credit at the college the athlete is transferring to.

Do you Need Help Navigating the Eligibility Requirements?

If you’d like more information about the continuing or transfer eligibility requirements, you can schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues Consult online, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

At the NCAA Convention in January 2020, NCAA Division II colleges and universities will be voting on a proposal to implement the “Transfer Portal” with governing rules similar to those now used at NCAA DI Universities.

If approved, the proposal will not take effect until August 2020 and will benefit student-athletes who choose to transfer during or after the 2020-21 academic year. Also, once a Division II student-athlete submits their transfer notification, their college would have 7 calendar days to submit their name into the Transfer Portal.

At recent NCAA meetings in Atlanta, there were differing viewpoints of whether this proposal should be implemented.

  • The Division II Management Council, a committee consisting of Division II athletic administrators from campuses and conference offices, voiced their support,
  • The Division II Presidents Council voted to oppose the proposal.

We’ll see how this plays out at the NCAA Convention and I’ll report back to you after the vote in January.

If you have questions about transferring from one college to another, schedule a confidential Transfer Consult online, or contact us at 913-766-1235 or rick@informedathlete.com.

College athletes who are struggling in a class and are thinking about dropping a class before a final exam should stop and consider a few things before they take action:

  • Will dropping the class affect my current eligibility right now? If it drops you below full-time status, you’ll be immediately ineligible for competition.
  • Will dropping the class affect my eligibility next semester? That depends upon your specific situation. For some football athletes, it could even affect your eligibility next Fall.
  • If I don’t drop the class, but fail it, how might that affect my eligibility? If your GPA drops too low, you may be ineligible for next semester.

What other implications are there that I’m not thinking about?

In a confidential phone consultation, we will discuss your specific situation and the impact that dropping a class or possibly staying in it but failing the course can have on your current and future eligibility.

Schedule your Eligibility Issues Consult online or call our office at 913-766-1235.

We get many calls this time of year when coaching changes are announced as Fall season sports wind down. In this article, I address some of the common questions we are asked.

Does an NCAA coaching change give me a “free” transfer?

A coaching change (whether the coach is fired or leaves of their own choosing) does not change anything about the steps to follow in a transfer or about whether an athlete can be immediately eligible at their new college upon transfer.

Does an NCAA coaching change affect my scholarship?

When a head coaching change occurs at the NCAA DI level, it is possible for the new coach to deny a returning athlete a spot on the roster. The University would be required to continue the athlete’s scholarship as long as the athlete makes satisfactory progress toward their degree. However, if the athlete wishes to continue competing in their sport, they will have to transfer in order to do so.

Does an NCAA coaching change void my NLI commitment?

When an athlete signs an NLI, they are signing with the university not with a particular coach. While some schools will grant an NLI release after a coaching change, that’s not always the case.

Do You Have Questions?

If you have questions about an NCAA coaching change and how your athlete might be affected, schedule a confidential scholarship strategies consult online or call us at 913-766-1235.

It IS possible for a recruit to sign both an NJCAA Letter of Intent with a junior college and also sign an NCAA National Letter of Intent with an NCAA Division I or II university.

Baseball and Football are the two most common sports where an athlete double-signs.

For baseball, an athlete may sign with both organizations if they want the option to go to junior college for just one year in hopes of then being drafted in the Major League Baseball draft and signing a professional contract. (Baseball players who enroll at a four-year college normally can’t be drafted until after their 3rd year of college unless they have an early birthday.)

For football, it has been somewhat common over the years to see an athlete sign with both an NCAA university and a Junior College program when the family isn’t sure whether the athlete will satisfy the NCAA academic requirements to be eligible as a freshman. The junior college the athlete signs with can then be their “Plan B” to play right away while getting bigger and stronger and then having the chance to be “re-recruited” from the junior college to an NCAA football program.

If you have questions regarding the National Letter of Intent and options available to your student-athlete, schedule a scholarship strategies consult online or by calling 913-766-1235 or sending an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

Wednesday, November 13 is the initial date for high school seniors to sign an NCAA National Letter of Intent in all sports other than Football.The Football signing date is December 18 for Division I programs and February 5 for Division II programs.

For athletes being recruited by junior colleges, November 1st was the first date for coaches at NJCAA member colleges to offer their NJCAA Letter of Intent to high school seniors in all sports other than Football. (The NJCAA football signing date is February 5.)

  • The National Letter of intent is not the same thing as an athletic scholarship agreement from an NCAA university. While the two documents go hand-in-hand, they are not one and the same.
  • A National Letter of Intent can’t be issued to a recruit unless that recruit is being offered an athletic scholarship. However, it is not a requirement for a recruit to sign a National Letter of Intent at the same time that they sign the university scholarship agreement being offered.
  • When a prospect signs an NLI, they are committing to attend that school for at least one full academic year in exchange for their scholarship. Once a prospect has signed an NLI, other DI and DII programs are to stop recruiting that prospect.
  • While NCAA DI universities are permitted to offer multi-year scholarships, the majority of DI athletic teams only offer one-year scholarships which are renewable each year. NCAA DII athletic programs are prohibited from offering multi-year scholarships.

We have a limited number of 30-minute private consults available Tuesday, November 12th and Wednesday, November 13th.

To be guaranteed a spot, purchase and schedule a confidential scholarship strategies consult online or call us at 913-766-1235.

Wednesday, November 13 is the initial date for high school seniors to sign an NCAA National Letter of Intent in all sports other than Football.The Football signing date is December 18 for Division I programs and February 5 for Division II programs.

We get many phone calls this time of year asking about the NCAA National Letter of Intent.  This article provides basic facts about what the NLI and athletic scholarship are and how they work together.  I also touch on an issue that some athletes may want to consider –  whether or not they SHOULD sign a National Letter of Intent.

Basic facts about the NCAA National Letter of Intent

  • The NCAA National Letter of intent is not the same thing as an athletic scholarship agreement from an NCAA university. While the two documents go hand-in-hand, they are not one and the same.
  • A National Letter of Intent can’t be issued to a recruit unless that recruit is being offered an athletic scholarship. However, it is not a requirement for a recruit to sign a National Letter of Intent at the same time that they sign the university scholarship agreement being offered.
  • When a prospect signs an NLI, they are committing to attend that school for at least one full academic year in exchange for their scholarship. Once a prospect has signed an NLI, other DI and DII programs are to stop recruiting that prospect.
  • While NCAA DI universities are permitted to offer multi-year scholarships, the majority of DI athletic teams only offer one-year scholarships which are renewable each year. NCAA DII athletic programs are prohibited from offering multi-year scholarships.

Should you Sign an NLI…OR MAYBE NOT?

An NLI is a legal document. If an athlete signs an NLI, they are now “locked in” to the school for one full year. Getting out of the NLI once it is signed can be difficult and sometimes costly.

A benefit to NOT signing an NLI is that if there is a coaching change before the signee begins college, the athlete isn’t locked in to that university and can pursue other options.

There are pros and cons to signing a National Letter of Intent. We can explain those in a confidential phone consultation. For questions about the National Letter of Intent or about athletic scholarships, schedule a confidential scholarship strategies consult online or contact us at rick@informedathlete.com or 913-766-1235.