If your athlete has signed an NJCAA Letter of Intent, or has been offered one by a junior college, I congratulate them on that opportunity!

But here are a few things those athletes should know about the NJCAA LOI:

  • Unlike the NCAA’s National Letter of Intent, an NJCAA LOI can be offered to and signed by a recruit even if no athletic scholarship is being offered to the recruit.
  • Once an athlete signs the LOI, they can’t be contacted by coaches at any other NJCAA college.

What happens if you change your mind after signing the LOI?

If a student-athlete decides after signing the LOI that they don’t want to attend that JUCO, they’ll need to request an NJCAA Letter of Intent Release before coaches at other NJCAA colleges can talk with them about a possible transfer.

A student-athlete who signs an NJCAA Letter of Intent but then chooses to transfer to another NJCAA college will also need to receive an NJCAA Transfer Waiver from the original JUCO that they signed with in order to be eligible.

  • The NJCAA Letter of Intent Release and the NJCAA Transfer Waiver are two separate documents. The first NJCAA college might sign the Release but not the Transfer Waiver.
  • If the student-athlete doesn’t receive the Transfer Waiver from the first NJCAA college, they’ll be ineligible for competition at the new college for one full academic year.

Furthermore, an athlete transferring within the same NJCAA conference from one college to another may be subject to more restrictive requirements.

  • They may not be eligible to compete at their new JUCO for one full academic year after a transfer from another college in the same conference.
  • They also may be prohibited from receiving a scholarship at the new NJCAA college.

Do you Have Questions Before your Athlete Signs an LOI or Need Help Navigating Through a Transfer?

Schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues or confidential Transfer Issues consult online if your athlete has questions/concerns about the rules that will specifically apply to your JUCO transfer student-athlete. You can also contact us by sending an email to rick@informedathlete.com or by calling 913-766-1235.

ACT or SAT scores will not be used in determining if a High School Recruit satisfies the NCAA requirements to receive Qualifier or Academic Redshirt/Partial Qualifier status for enrolling at an NCAA Division I or II university during the 2021-22 academic year.

However, don’t misinterpret this and think that the ACT or SAT test is no longer important for NCAA eligibility.

This is only a temporary exception that was granted for the current year and next academic year because of the number of ACT and SAT testing opportunities that have been cancelled or postponed during the last year.

For recruits who will be enrolling at an NCAA university for the 2022-23 or later academic years, an ACT or SAT score will still be required in order to be certified eligible for an athletic scholarship, practice and competition in the freshman year.

Eligibility issues affect student-athletes at all levels from high school to junior college and 4-year universities. Not knowing, understanding, and meeting the eligibility rules can have long-term consequences. Problems meeting the eligibility standards can set-back and even derail a student-athlete’s entire athletic career.

If you have questions about the NCAA eligibility requirements for high school recruits, contact us by writing to rick@informedathlete.com or by calling 913-766-1235. You can also schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues consult online.

We’ve had an increasing number of families contact us to ask whether their athlete should consider “opting out” from their spring season and what it means if they do.

The answer can be different depending on a number of factors. Those factors include:

  • The level of college that your athlete attends (NCAA D1, D2, D3, etc.).
  • Is the athlete receiving an athletic scholarship?
  • Has the Spring sport season started for your athlete?
  • If the season has started, has your athlete appeared in a game for their team yet?
  • Does your athlete want to continue at their same college next year, or are they planning to transfer?

For a confidential discussion of the Opt-Out rules and how your student-athlete might be able to benefit from them, schedule a Scholarship Strategies consult online, send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call us at 913-766-1235.

During the recent NCAA Convention, Division II members voted to do away with the academic status of “Non-Qualifier” effective August 1, 2021.

This action means that any student-athlete who enrolls at an NCAA Division II institution on or after August 1, 2021 will be classified as either a Qualifier or as a Partial Qualifier.

Any student-athlete currently attending a junior college as a Non-Qualifier or who would be classified as a Non-Qualifier as a freshman entering a Division II university this coming Fall will be treated as a Partial Qualifier effective August 1.

As a result of this action, a student-athlete who enrolls at a Division II university with Partial Qualifier status will be able to practice and receive an athletic scholarship during their first year of enrollment. A Partial Qualifier will not, however, be eligible for competition in their first year.

If you have questions about how this changing rule may impact you or your athlete, schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues consult online, send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call 913-766-1235.