NCAA Division I or II athletes who are thinking about putting their name in the Transfer Portal before the next semester or quarter begins should consider these things:

For NCAA Division I Student-Athletes

When an athlete submits their name for the Transfer Portal during the period between terms, their university has the right to cancel the athlete’s scholarship before the next term begins.

If the athlete is planning to stay at their current university this Spring while exploring other opportunities for next Fall, this could potentially have devastating financial consequences.

For NCAA Division II Student-Athletes

The rule is a bit different. The school doesn’t have the right to immediately cancel the athlete’s scholarship before the next term begins as long as the athlete is academically eligible and is fulfilling any other athletic responsibilities that their coach and athletic department expect of them.

However, if the athlete doesn’t want to continue practicing and working out with their team after putting their name in the Transfer Portal, a Division II university would have the right to immediately cancel the athlete’s scholarship if their coach or athletic department interpret their actions as quitting their team.

Do You Have Questions?

If your athlete is considering a transfer and you would like to review and discuss the Transfer rules, you can schedule a confidential Transfer Consult online. You can also send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call us at 913-766-1235.

We recently learned of student-athletes at an NCAA Division I university who have created GoFundMe pages to openly request donations for their living expenses.

This type of solicitation is NOT permitted as part of the NCAA’s new Name, Image and Likeness policy. In fact, the student-athletes described above have received an impermissible benefit and will likely need to repay the value they have received to a charity to have their competitive eligibility reinstated by the NCAA.

A student-athlete must provide some type of service or “deliverable” in exchange for receiving an NIL payment.

Examples can include a wide variety of activities, from doing a TV commercial for a car dealership to signing autographs at a store’s grand opening to appearing at a child’s birthday party for photo opportunities.

The NCAA has recently updated their Question and Answer document regarding the NIL policy.

  • This document includes an update addressing the type of situation I’ve described above, as well as emphasizing that NIL agreements are not to be intended as a recruiting inducement (e.g., a booster guaranteeing an NIL opportunity once a recruit enrolls at their favorite university).
  • The update also includes a recommendation that international student-athletes check with their designated school office for all international students regarding any potential tax implications and impact on their immigration status if they participate in NIL opportunities.

The Q and A document can be viewed through this link:

https://ncaaorg.s3.amazonaws.com/ncaa/NIL/NIL_QandA.pdf

This article is written to give junior college athletes a heads-up to potential eligibility issues that can create huge problems if they plan to transfer to an NCAA school.

And even worse, if the eligibility issue isn’t discovered until AFTER the JUCO transfer has already started attending an NCAA school, the athlete won’t be eligible to compete in their first year at the new university.

My advice to avoid these headaches and problems is to be clearly informed and knowledgeable about the academic requirements they must meet in order to transfer to an NCAA school.

Please keep in mind that student-athletes who start their college career at a junior college can have differing academic requirements when it comes time to transfer to an NCAA school.

For example:

  • Was the Junior College Student-Athlete a “qualifier” or “non-qualifier” coming out of high school? The answer to this will affect what a junior college transfer athlete must achieve academically to be eligible to compete at an NCAA DI or DII school.
  • How many semesters did the Junior College Student-Athlete attend the junior college as a full-time student?
  • Was the Junior College Student-Athlete required to earn their Associates Degree to be academically eligible upon transfer to an NCAA school?

These are the types of issues that can derail a Junior College Student-Athlete’s athletic and academic career and end up costing them personally and financially.

If a Junior College Transfer Athlete has not satisfied all necessary NCAA academic requirements BEFORE they begin attending their new university, they won’t be able to compete during their first academic year of attendance and may also not be qualified to receive an athletic scholarship!

Knowing your eligibility status ahead of time can allow a student-athlete to make the adjustments that are needed to avoid disappointment and possibly financial problems down the road.

If you are a Junior College Transfer Athlete (or parent of one) and you are uncertain about your NCAA academic eligibility status, Informed Athlete can help:

If you have questions, contact Rick Allen at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.