We’ve recently been receiving a number of questions about the rules and academic requirements for a 4-2-4 transfer (from a four-year college to a two-year college, and then transferring to another four-year college).

This type of transfer can be useful for various situations, but here are three of the most common:

  • An athlete wants to leave their four-year college to have a better playing opportunity in their sport and to then be “re-recruited” back to the four-year college level.
  • An athlete needs to focus on their academic responsibilities, raise their GPA, and then return to the four-year college level (perhaps even to the four-year college they previously attended).
  • Or, an athlete simply wants to attend a less-expensive college closer to home while they determine where they want to eventually enroll to earn their four-year degree.

The confusing part about the 4-2-4 transfer rules

The academic requirements and other rules (such as number of semesters required at the two-year college) are different depending upon whether the athlete will end up at the NCAA Division I, Division II, Division III, or NAIA level.

Of course, the natural question then becomes “How do I know what requirements to satisfy if I’m not even sure what college level – let alone the specific college – that I’m going to end up at??”

This is a situation in which one of our confidential consultations can be very helpful to explain these specific rules and the differences between the rules for different divisions. We can also provide a detailed Transcript Review to advise on your athlete’s progress toward satisfying these academic requirements.

For help in navigating the academic requirements and rules for a successful transfer, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

If you’re a college athlete who is struggling in a class (or parent of one), you may be thinking about dropping that class before the final exam. Before doing that, there are a number of things that should be considered:

  • Will dropping the class affect my current eligibility right now? (If it drops you below full-time status, you’ll become immediately ineligible for competition.)
  • Will dropping the class affect my eligibility next semester? (That depends upon your specific situation. For some football athletes, it could even effect your eligibility next Fall.)
  • If I don’t drop the class, but fail it, how might that effect my eligibility? (If your GPA drops too low, you may be ineligible for next semester.)
  • What other implications are there that I’m not thinking about?

In a confidential phone consultation, we can discuss your specific situation and the impact that dropping a course, or possibly staying in it but failing the course, can have on your current and future eligibility. Schedule an Eligibility Consult online, call our office at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

We’ve been having a lot of parents ask us about “this rule that we’ve heard about” which would permit their athlete to appear in up to four games and still be able to claim a redshirt season in their sport.

The “Four Game Rule” that these parents are referring to only applies to the sport of football at the NCAA Division I level.

In every other sport, participation during any portion of a game, meet, or match during the regular season will trigger the use of one of an athlete’s four seasons of competition.

Do you need help understanding or navigating the rules?

If you have any questions about the “Four Game Rule” or any other eligibility issues that affect your student-athlete, schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues Consult online or contact us at 913-766-1235 or via email to rick@informedathlete.com.”

We recently consulted with a student-athlete who transferred to an NCAA Division II university only to learn that she would not be academically eligible this year even though she earned her Associates Degree at her junior college during the summer.

  • This student-athlete had not been informed that there are multiple NCAA academic requirements that must be satisfied to be eligible when transferring from one college to another.
  • She thought that the completion of her Associates Degree was all that she needed to be eligible as a transfer.

Unfortunately, she wasn’t informed that she was also required to earn at least 9 credit hours of transferable degree credit during her last semester at the junior college.

She didn’t have enough credit hours that were accepted as transfer credit to the Division II university and therefore wasn’t eligible to compete during her first year in the Division II program.

The 9-Hour Rule is applicable to ALL NCAA DII Continuing and Transfer Athletes

In fact, any NCAA Division II athlete – even a continuing student-athlete at their same university – must earn at least 9 credit hours (or 8 if their college is on the quarter system) in the preceding term of full-time attendance to be eligible the following term.

For a transfer athlete, those credit hours must be acceptable for transfer credit at the college the athlete is transferring to.

Do you Need Help Navigating the Eligibility Requirements?

If you’d like more information about the continuing or transfer eligibility requirements, you can schedule a confidential Eligibility Issues Consult online, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

College athletes who are struggling in a class and are thinking about dropping a class before a final exam should stop and consider a few things before they take action:

  • Will dropping the class affect my current eligibility right now? If it drops you below full-time status, you’ll be immediately ineligible for competition.
  • Will dropping the class affect my eligibility next semester? That depends upon your specific situation. For some football athletes, it could even affect your eligibility next Fall.
  • If I don’t drop the class, but fail it, how might that affect my eligibility? If your GPA drops too low, you may be ineligible for next semester.

What other implications are there that I’m not thinking about?

In a confidential phone consultation, we will discuss your specific situation and the impact that dropping a class or possibly staying in it but failing the course can have on your current and future eligibility.

Schedule your Eligibility Issues Consult online or call our office at 913-766-1235.

We were recently contacted by a family whose son is a 2020 HS grad and hasn’t yet taken the ACT or SAT test.

The athlete and his family were not aware of how important his ACT or SAT test score is in the recruiting process.

Here’s why:

While athletic ability is important, an athlete’s NCAA eligibility status is a top consideration for many college recruiters. More coaches might be interested if they know a recruit’s ACT or SAT test score so they have an idea of their NCAA eligibility status and opportunity to be admitted into their university.

Some college athletic departments don’t allow an athlete to make an official visit to their campus if the athlete doesn’t have an ACT or SAT score on file (even though it’s not a requirement under the NCAA rules).

Upcoming ACT & SAT Test Deadlines

The deadline to register for the December ACT and SAT tests is fast approaching. November 8 is the regular registration deadline for both the December 7 SAT test and the December 14 ACT test.

There is a late registration period available for each test, but there will be an additional late fee required at the time of registration. Also, those registering late may not be able to get into their first choice of test location.

The late registration period for the December 7 SAT test is November 9-26, while the late period to register for the December 14 ACT test is November 9-22.

Do you have questions about your athlete’s eligibility status?

For questions about recruiting or academic eligibility requirements for NCAA or NAIA, schedule a confidential eligibility issues consult online, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

High School Athletes who are considering an NAIA college should be aware that the NAIA has increased one of their academic requirements to be immediately eligible as an incoming freshman.

To be eligible as an incoming freshman to an NAIA college, an athlete must satisfy two of three academic requirements:

  • A cumulative high school GPA of 2.000 or higher on a 4.000.
  • Rank in the upper half of the athlete’s graduating class per final official high school transcript.
  • A minimum ACT composite score of 18 or 970 on the SAT (Reading/Writing and Math sections) for tests taken on or after May 1, 2019.
  • For ACT tests taken March 2016 through April 30, 2019, the minimum composite score is 16. For SAT tests taken prior to May 1, 2019, the minimum required score is 860.

If you have a question about NAIA or NCAA eligibility requirements, schedule a confidential consult online, or contact us  at 913-766-1235 or rick@informedathlete.com.

Yesterday, the NCAA’s Board of Governors voted unanimously to begin the legislative process that will permit NCAA student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness “in a manner consistent with the collegiate model.”

This vote regarding the potential use of an athlete’s “name, image, or likeness” (commonly referred to as “NIL”) paves the way for student-athletes to potentially receive payment for their autographs, for personal appearances, and for their picture or image (and possibly their voice) to promote commercial products and services.

Developing these new rules will certainly be no easy task.

The Board in conjunction with a “Federal and State Legislation Working Group” has established a list of principles and guidelines to direct the work of the NCAA, conferences, and university representatives in all three divisions as they develop and propose appropriate legislation to be considered by NCAA member institutions.

Among these principles and guidelines are the following:

  • “Ensure rules are transparent, focused and enforceable and facilitate fair and balanced competition.”
  • “Protect the recruiting environment and prohibit inducements to select, remain at, or transfer to a specific institution.”
  • “Maintain the priorities of education and the collegiate experience to provide opportunities for student-athlete success.”

As you might imagine, I have many questions as to how this will play out over the coming months.

  • For example, how will the NCAA create rules that will allow campus compliance administrators to determine, much less enforce how much a student-athlete’s signature, personal appearance at an event, or use of likeness is worth?
  • How will standards be set such that universities with large alumni bases and/or that are located in large metropolitan areas with thousands of businesses won’t have a recruiting advantage over mid-major and smaller universities in the Midwest or great plains states because of the endorsement opportunities that will be available to athletes at those larger universities?

The Board of Governors has expressed a desire for each NCAA division to come up with new rules as soon as possible, but no later than January 2021. For the full NCAA press release, click on this link:  https://bit.ly/2JxUsu8.

We’ll keep you updated as we learn more.  In the meantime, if you have any questions call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

 

We regularly hear from Junior College Athletes who transfer to an NCAA program and say they weren’t informed until weeks into the semester that they don’t meet the academic requirements to be eligible. 

What options does a student-athlete have in this situation? 

The best situation is for this to NOT happen.

If an athlete is informed before school starts, they may have the option to go back to the JUCO for one more semester as a full or part-time student to satisfy the academic requirements.

However, if the student-athlete has already started school at the NCAA school and they are declared ineligible, their options are limited and more complicated:

  • The student-athlete is stuck at that college and is now ineligible for their first academic year. He or she must now work to earn their academic eligibility to be able to compete next year at this college.
  • Also, because an athlete must be academically eligible when they leave their current school in order to be immediately eligible as a transfer to another NCAA member school, the student-athlete either needs to stay at this school and work to regain his or her eligibility there, OR
  • If the athlete chooses to transfer to another NCAA college before he/she regains eligibility where they are, then the athlete will be ineligible for their first academic year at the next college.
  • Another option is that the student-athlete could transfer to an NAIA college where it would be possible to regain eligibility after one semester.

How can an athlete AVOID this type of situation?

Make sure you are certified academically eligible by the school you are transferring to before classes begin.

How frequently does this type of thing happen?

More frequently than you would think. These are the type of situations I hate because they could easily be prevented.

How can you prevent this from happening to your athlete?

We frequently work with junior college athletes to make sure they’re eligible at their NCAA school of choice by doing a college transcript review.

If you have questions or need assistance, call Informed Athlete at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

I’m certain that our daughter would have fallen through the cracks and not been deemed an NCAA Qualifier without your help. We contacted you just in time so that we could advocate on her behalf with her high school and communicate effectively with her college. Her unique course load in high school made this a challenge. I’m excited to report that she’s been deemed a Qualifier and is competing now with her team.

Father of a D I softball player

The worst thing I had to do when I worked on campus was tell a student-athlete they weren’t academically eligible and couldn’t play their sport.

Eligibility issues affect student-athletes at all levels from high school, to junior college, and 4-year universities. Not knowing, understanding, and meeting the eligibility rules can have serious short and long-term consequences. Problems meeting the eligibility standards can set back and even derail a student-athlete’s entire athletic career.

Eligibility Rules are different at each level (NCAA, NAIA, and NJCAA), each division (NCAA Division I, II, III), and even at different conferences and schools.

Do You Need Assistance?

If you or your athlete is unsure about their eligibility status, we can help by providing a confidential private phone or Skype consultation. During the Eligibility Issues Consult, we will discuss your situation, answer any questions you may have and if needed, help determine your best set of “next steps.”

Schedule your eligibility consultation online, call us at 913-766-1235, or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com