High School athletes who are offered 10-15% of a full scholarship by a 4-year college coach might be better advised to not accept the scholarship and instead be a walk-on.

The reason?

They may have more flexibility should they decide to transfer in the future.

The NCAA recently approved a change that will allow walk-on student-athletes to transfer to a Division I program from another 4-year university and be immediately eligible at their new school. In addition, the school that the athlete is leaving will not be allowed to have an objection to the transfer.

This new rule impacts a student-athlete who is:

  • A walk-on athlete from a 4-year college program that awarded athletic scholarships, or
  • A non-recruited athlete from a 4-year college program that doesn’t provide athletic scholarships (such as an Ivy League university).

If you have questions about the transfer rules and how they could impact your athlete in the future, schedule a confidential Transfer Consult online, or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

JUCO Student-athletes transferring to NCAA Division I or II programs should know that there are specific academic requirements that must be achieved to be immediately eligible at an NCAA Division I or II university.

The academic eligibility requirements are different for NCAA Division I compared to Division II, and can also depend upon the student-athlete’s status as a “Qualifier” as well as how many semesters they have attended at their JUCO.

There are, however, two NCAA rules/requirements that apply to a junior college transfer regardless of whether they are transferring to a Division I or II university:

  • The first is that a JUCO transfer can only use 2 credit hours of Physical Education Activity courses toward the required transferable degree credits, unless the athlete is going to major in Physical Education or another major which calls for additional credit hours in those types of courses.
  • The second consistent requirement is that remedial-level courses taken at a junior college can’t be used to satisfy the academic requirements for immediate eligibility when transferring from a junior college to an NCAA university.

For more information on eligibility issues that JUCO athletes often face when transferring, you might be interested in reading this article: JUCO Student-Athletes and Eligibility Issues at NCAA Schools.

If you have questions about the NCAA academic requirements that JUCO student-athletes must meet to be immediately eligible at an NCAA university, click Transfer Consult Options to learn how we can help.

If you’d prefer to schedule a consult directly with our office, call Informed Athlete at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

One of the most commonly encountered roadblocks to a transfer from one school to another is when a student-athlete has eligibility issues. This seems to be especially true when a student-athlete transfers from a junior college to an NCAA school.

Student-Athletes who start their college career at a junior college have differing academic requirements when it comes time to transfer to an NCAA school.

For example:

  • Was the student-athlete a “qualifier” or “non-qualifier” coming out of high school? The answer to this will affect what a junior college transfer athlete must achieve academically to be eligible to compete at an NCAA DI or DII school.
  • How many semesters did a student-athlete attend at a junior college?
  • Was the student-athlete required to earn their Associates Degree before they were ruled academically eligible to transfer to an NCAA school?

These are the types of things that frequently derail a Junior College student-athlete’s athletic and academic career and end up costing them personally and financially.

If a student-athlete has not satisfied all necessary academic requirements BEFORE starting classes this Fall, they won’t be able to compete for their university during the 2019-2020 academic year and may also not be qualified to receive an athletic scholarship!

Knowing the academic requirements for certain ahead of time can allow a student-athlete to make the adjustments that are needed to avoid disappointment and possibly financial problems down the road.

If you are uncertain about your eligibility status, Informed Athlete can help!

  • Book a PERSONAL PHONE OR SKYPE CONSULT when answers to your questions require more information and are more complex or an EMAIL CONSULT if you need quick, simple answers to concise questions.

Scholarship student-athletes (in sports other than baseball, basketball, football, and men’s ice hockey) who wish to transfer to an NCAA Division I program and be immediately eligible at their new school must meet two conditions:

  • The athlete must be academically eligible at the school they are transferring from.
  • The athletic department your athlete is leaving must not have an objection to the transfer.

A common question from many parents we have consulted with has been “How will my athlete know whether their school is filing an objection?”

And my answer has been that the school is required to provide an appeal opportunity. But until now, there has not been a clear answer as to how the student-athlete officially learns whether their previous school has approved or denied their request.

NCAA DI Schools Must Now Provide Written Notification to the Student-Athlete

At the recent NCAA Rules Seminar, it was explained that NCAA Division I athletic programs that have an objection to a student-athlete using the One-Time Transfer Exception are now required to provide written notification directly to the student-athlete and that they have the right to an appeal hearing when their original school objects to the transfer.

This is a very positive change because these transfer notification forms are entered into the Transfer Portal which is not accessible to student-athletes. Previously, student-athletes were sometimes blindsided by finding out late in the transfer process that their school was objecting to their transfer.

Do you Have Questions?

If you need personal assistance, schedule a confidential transfer consultation online or call us at 913-766-1235.

The NCAA’s DI transfer rule change will help qualified DI non-scholarship student-athletes to be immediately eligible in their first season at a new university.

At the recent NCAA Rules Seminar in Indianapolis, I got additional clarification which I’m sharing in this blog post.

Walk-on/Non-recruited Transfer Exceptions

An athlete transferring to a Division I university next Fall as an undergraduate will have the chance to be immediately eligible if:

  • The athlete’s previous four-year college provided athletic scholarships in their sport, but the athlete has not received an athletic scholarship, OR
  • The athlete’s previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, and the athlete was not “recruited” by the previous four-year college.

There is one aspect of this change that has NOT received much publicity at all, but is one that has previously been a concern for many of our clients:

The university these athletes will be leaving WILL NOT BE ABLE TO OBJECT to the athlete being immediately eligible next year at their new university.

However, it IS necessary to be academically eligible at the time you leave your previous university in order to receive an athletic scholarship in your first year at a new Division I university.

Do you have questions?

If you have questions about the changes to the NCAA Division I transfer rules, contact us at 913-766-1235 or via e-mail at rick@informedathlete.com

As of August 1, 2019, these NCAA DI Transfer Rules will go into effect:

Walk-on/Non-Recruited Transfer Exceptions

A student-athlete transferring to a Division I university next Fall as an undergraduate can possibly be immediately eligible if:

  • Their previous four-year college provided athletic scholarships in their sport, but the athlete has not received an athletic scholarship, OR
  • Their previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, and the athlete was not “recruited” by that college.

Student-Athletes in position to benefit from this change will still need to be academically eligible at their new university.

Also, while these changes have received lots of publicity in social media, there is one aspect of this change that has NOT received much publicity at all.

The university that these athletes are transferring from WILL NOT be allowed to object to the athlete being immediately eligible next year at their new university (a condition of the One-Time Transfer Exception which I have shared with many of our clients)!

Graduate Transfer Exception

An athlete transferring as a graduate student to an NCAA Division I university in the sports of baseball, basketball, football, and men’s ice hockey next Fall will have the chance to be immediately eligible (without need for a waiver from the NCAA) as long as:

  • The athlete’s previous four-year college did not provide athletic scholarships, OR
  • The athlete never received athletic scholarships while enrolled at a four-year college.

Do you need assistance?

If you have questions about the NCAA transfer rules and how these changes might possibly affect your student-athlete, schedule a confidential consultation online or call us at 913-766-1235.

Two questions that we are frequently asked by DI and DII student-athletes regarding the transfer process are:

NCAA DI Student-Athlete:Do I still need to be in the NCAA Transfer Portal if I’ve been cut from the team or have withdrawn from my school?

NCAA DII Student-Athlete:Do I still need to have “permission to contact” if I’ve been cut from the team or have withdrawn from my school?

In most cases, that answer is “yes.”

In both of the above cases, if a student-athlete is cut from team or withdraws from the school, they have 2 choices:

  • An NCAA DI Student-Athlete should inform their coach and compliance office in writing that they want to be placed into the NCAA Transfer Portal.
  • An NCAA DII Student-Athlete should send an email to their coach and compliance office to request “permission to contact.”

OR,

  • If either the NCAA DI or DII student-athlete chooses not to do the above, then they must wait one full academic year after withdrawal from their school before contacting other coaches about transferring.

So, even if your athlete left their team at the end of the Fall semester, or were cut from the team by their coach, they still need to be added to the Transfer Portal or request permission to contact other universities if they’re planning to transfer to a Division I or II program.

If you have other questions about what you should or should not do when considering a transfer, call us at 913-766-1235 to schedule a Transfer Consult Call.

Student-athletes who are thinking about transferring to another school have many things to consider. Some of these things include when and how to tell the coach and how to find another school.

Here are a few things you should know BEFORE you talk to your coach:

If you’re a current student-athlete on scholarship at an NCAA DI or II school, the one thing you should NOT do is sign a “voluntary withdrawal form.”

Signing a voluntary withdrawal form gives your school the right to immediately cancel your athletic scholarship. This can create all kinds of financial and personal problems that you may not be prepared for.

Another thing to be aware of before talking to the coach is that once you give notice of your intent to transfer to a Division I University, the school is required to place your name and contact info into the NCAA Transfer Portal within 2 business days of your request.

The coach could then tell you to clean out your locker and bar you from the athletic facilities. Click What Happens When an Athlete Files an NCAA Intent to Transfer Notification to read my recent blog about this.

Transferring to another school can result in a fresh start with opportunities to excel both academically and athletically. However, the actual transfer process itself can be very stressful and cause financial and emotional strain.

Over the past 11 years, we’ve helped hundreds of student-athletes successfully navigate the transfer process.

If you’re a student-athlete (or parent of one) who is considering a transfer from your current school, give us a call. In a private Transfer Consult Call, we can guide and advise you through the steps to transfer with the least amount of stress and drama.

Schedule your confidential Transfer Consult online. If you prefer, send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call us at 913-766-1235 to set your consult.

Last Fall, NCAA Division I changed their transfer procedures.  A DI student-athlete previously had to ask for “permission to transfer” before they were allowed to contact other colleges.

Now, student-athletes can file a written “Intent to Transfer” request.   After an “Intent to Transfer” request is submitted, the school is required to enter their name and contact info in the NCAA Transfer Portal within 2 business days.  Other DI schools can then review and contact the student-athlete.

Many student-athletes are eager to voice their plans to transfer earlier than they otherwise would have in the past.  However, some athletes are experiencing difficulties once they file an intent to transfer notification.  In many cases, they are barred from the locker room and can no longer use the athletic facilities.

Most transfers are stressful and made even worse if not navigated properly.  If you or your athlete is considering a transfer to another school, we can advise, guide, and support you through the process.  Schedule a confidential transfer consult online, by calling us at 913-766-1235 or sending an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

Informed Athlete® receives many calls from parents of student-athletes who have transferred from a junior college to an NCAA sports program and then learn they aren’t eligible to compete after they have already started attending classes.

This is because the student-athlete did not satisfy the necessary NCAA academic transfer requirements while attending the junior college.

If you have a junior college athlete who is transferring to an NCAA college for the Spring semester, and are unsure whether they will be eligible for competition this Spring, we can provide a confidential consultation to explain those requirements and discuss options that may be available for your athlete. Click here to schedule a confidential phone consult or email consult, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com