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August 1 is a very important date for certain aspects of recruiting for many NCAA Division I sports programs. Those recruiting opportunities that can begin on August 1 are listed below:

Official Visits – Can be provided August 1 by Division I programs to recruits who will be entering their junior year of high school, with the following exceptions:

  • Baseball, Softball, and Lacrosse – Sept. 1 of junior year of HS
  • Women’s Basketball and Football – April of junior year of HS

Unofficial Visits – Division I programs can be actively involved in unofficial visits for recruits who will be entering their junior year of high school starting August 1, with the following exceptions:

  • Football and Women’s Basketball – Any time, no restrictions.
  • Men’s Ice Hockey – January 1 of sophomore year of HS
  • Men’s Basketball – August 1 before sophomore year of HS
  • Baseball, Softball, and Lacrosse – Sept. 1 of junior year of HS

Off-Campus Contacts – Face-to-face interaction between Division I coaches and prospects (and/or their family) at off-campus locations permissible August 1 before their junior year with the following exceptions:

  • Men’s Basketball – Opening day of junior year of HS
  • Lacrosse and Softball – September 1 of junior year of HS
  • Women’s Basketball – March 1 of junior year of HS
  • Baseball and Football – July 1 after junior year of HS

If you have questions about the NCAA recruiting rules for your specific sport of interest, contact us at 913-766-1235 or via email to rick@informedathlete.com

The NCAA Division I Council recently proposed changes to the Division I recruiting timeline that will adjust key recruiting dates in all sports other than football and basketball.  The proposed changes are expected to be voted on in April 2019.

One proposal addressed the sport of men’s ice hockey, while the other proposal addressed all Division I sports except hockey, football and basketball.

Proposal One: Prospects being recruited for men’s ice hockey would be allowed to make unofficial visits to campus to meet with coaches and tour athletic facilities as early as January 1 of the sophomore year of high school if this proposal is approved.

Currently, unofficial visits involving athletic staff are not permissible until September 1st of a prospect’s junior year of high school. The hockey proposal would also permit official visits to Division I campuses beginning August 1 before the start of a prospect’s junior year.

Proposal Two: For all sports other than football, basketball, and men’s ice hockey, the proposed changes would permit prospects to have communication with Division I coaches – whether initiated by the coach or the prospect – starting on June 15 after the sophomore year of high school. Also, the permissible date for official and unofficial visits would be moved one month earlier to August 1 from September 1.

NCAA universities and conferences will be providing feedback to the Division I Council prior to their vote in April, so these proposals could be revised before the final vote. Look for updates in the Spring regarding these proposals as we get closer to April.

For more information about NCAA recruiting rules, visit our website. If you’d like a confidential consult as to how these rules or other rules could impact you or your athlete, schedule a phone or email consult online, call us at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

Friday, June 15th was the first day for NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball coaches to begin to place recruiting phone calls and send recruiting correspondence (emails, direct messages, etc.) to high school recruits in the graduating class of 2020.

June 15 was also the first day for coaches in all NCAA Division II sports to begin to recruit high school prospects who will graduate in 2020. These activities can include recruiting phone calls, sending recruiting correspondence, AND also offering official visits to a Division II campus.

If you’d like a complimentary copy, click NCAA Recruiting Calendars, and sign up to receive the most current calendars with a summary of important dates and most current need-to-know recruiting info.

Other ways we help student-athletes and their families navigate through the recruiting process include:

Recruiting Rules Consults  via phone or email

College Visit Consult Packages

Informed Athlete’s Campus Visits Guide

 

If you’re a high school recruit competing for an athletic scholarship offer, have you defined your college experience expectations? 

Do you want to compete at the highest level possible and try to win a championship for your team – whether that’s a conference, regional, or national championship?

Or, will you be completely happy if you’re enjoying college, making lifelong friendships, and possibly participating on a junior varsity college team to stay physically active and spend more time with some of your new friends?

Many colleges at both the NCAA and NAIA level use their athletic teams to boost their enrollment numbers. 

But, some programs take that even a step further by adding junior varsity teams to the athletic program.  Those coaches might recruit you to join their teams with the opportunity of being promoted to the varsity level at some point in your college career, but they may primarily be looking to just boost college enrollment.

Don’t get me wrong – if you will be happy being on the JV team and not having as many commitments on your time as you would have with practice and travel commitments of a varsity program, then that’s great.

The point I want to make is to be sure you ask – especially at smaller colleges – if they have both a varsity and junior varsity team in your sport, and where the coach sees you fitting into the program.  As the article that I’ve linked below describes, the coach may be more interested in your participation to boost college enrollment rather than for the talent that you can provide to help their team win.
http://blog.naia.org/index.php/2017/11/06/goshen-college-boosting-recruitment-with-junior-varsity-athletics/

If you’re a high school recruit and have questions, click here to learn how to schedule a confidential consult or contact us directly at 913-766-1235.

We’re sharing a story from an Informed Athlete client.  His story is not an uncommon one; in fact, you might be facing a similar situation.

His story illustrates how easy it is to make mistakes when you don’t know what questions to ask or what things to look for when talking with college coaches or visiting campus.

“Rick Allen and Informed Athlete is an invaluable resource to athletes and their parents for the D1 Baseball recruiting, transferring and signing process.

I only wish that we knew of Rick and his company when our son was in high school going through the recruiting process.  Our son turned down scholarship offers from several schools to play at his “dream school.” 

What we did not know was that D1 baseball only has 11.7 scholarships to give to 27 members of their 35 man baseball roster.  That meant that 8 players on the roster were not “on money.”

We were ignorant and did not know that this meant those players (along with any walk-ons), could be cut from the team after fall practice and not count against the 35 man roster. In other words, the 27 players on money counted against the roster in the Spring so they were very unlikely to get cut no matter what for that year.

Of course, our dream school did not tell us this.  Worse yet, since they had officially recruited my son,  he could not simply  transfer to another D1 school that wanted him without sitting out a year.

Rick Allen guided us through the transfer from his D1 school to a JUCO program and helped us navigate very difficult and confusing rules on how that transfer had to occur if my son was going to transfer back to a D1 program after a year in JUCO. 

Without his help and guidance, I am confident that my son’s career would be in serious jeopardy, if not over completely.  Instead, he is thriving at his new D1 program.

College athletics is BIG BUSINESS that makes BIG MONEY. Do not let your son get caught in a numbers game or be put on the shelf like a commodity until the players in front of him move on. 

Rick Allen can guide you step by step on every decision so you are armed with the knowledge to ask the right questions of your recruiting coach and program.

Do not risk your son’s career or trust that D1 programs have his best interest in mind.  It’s all about the money, so get informed today by the best in the business. 

Thank you Rick!!!!!   Finally, someone with knowledge that we could trust and rely upon for the advice we needed.”