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When an NCAA DI athlete is considering a transfer to another DI university, there are 2 basic steps in the process.

Step 1:

Submit a written request to be entered into the Transfer Portal.

Prior to the establishment of the NCAA DI Transfer Portal last year, a student-athlete was required to get the permission of his/her coach for a request to speak to other schools. The coach could deny an athlete’s request for permission to speak with all other schools. The coach could also restrict an athlete from talking to particular schools.

This changed in October 2018. Now a student-athlete is required to submit a written request to their compliance office asking to be entered into the Transfer Portal. However, they should inform their coach before contacting the compliance office.

Step 2:

The school the athlete is leaving may be able to object to the student-athlete being immediately eligible at their next school. The student-athlete will then need to sit out a year of competition unless an appeal or a waiver is approved.

Why does a school do this?

There are several reasons that the original school can object. One of the reasons is when the student-athlete’s GPA is under 2.60.

When a transferring athlete has a GPA of 2.60 or higher, their team can receive an APR (Academic Progress Rate) “adjustment” so that they won’t lose the retention point for that athlete. As a result, that team’s APR won’t be negatively impacted by the athlete’s transfer.

To learn more about how the APR can affect an athlete’s transfer, here’s a link to an article on our website: https://informedathlete.com/how-the-academic-progress-rate-apr-can-affect-an-athletes-ncaa-transfer/

Does the transfer athlete have any options?

If the school to which the athlete is transferring agrees to file for a NCAA waiver, they have the potential to be ruled immediately eligible depending on whether the NCAA approves it.

Do you need help?

If your athlete is considering a transfer and their GPA is a concern or you have other questions, we can discuss your specific situation and help you develop a plan to navigate through the process.  Schedule a confidential consult online or call our office at 913-766-1235.

Social media and media outlets continue to speculate and report on college athletes who they think might be considering a transfer.  This past week, some student-athletes learned that they weren’t going to be the starter at their position and decided that the “grass is greener” at another university.

This time of year, we get many calls regarding potential transfers.  We’re always glad when a student-athlete or their parents call us before they take action because making the wrong decision can have huge negative consequences financially and personally long after the social media outlets stop talking about it. 

Here are a few things to think about before taking action:  

FIRST AND FOREMOST: Is your athlete CERTAIN that transferring is the best decision for them and that they definitely want to leave their current university??

Media reports indicate that there are more than 1000 athletes in the NCAA Transfer Portal (across all sports) and it’s unlikely that all of them will find another college team to transfer to.

Once an athlete submits their name for the NCAA Transfer Portal, it’s possible that they will be removed from their team and will lose their scholarship at the end of the semester. They could lose that opportunity and not find a new one.

Other important considerations:

Participating in organized practices before classes start, even if a student-athlete leaves and withdraws from the school before attending classes, will make them a transfer athlete under the NCAA rules and subject to transfer rules and requirements.

If an athlete has already started attending classes for this semester and is registered as a full-time student, it is rarely a good idea for them to withdraw from classes in the middle of the semester or quarter to transfer elsewhere. Encourage them to at least finish out this current term of attendance.

NCAA Division I athletes should inform their athletic department compliance office in writing or via email that they want to be entered into the NCAA Transfer Portal. Also, while not a specific requirement, it is always best to show the coach the courtesy and respect of informing them of your intentions before sending an email to the compliance office.

Also for Division I athletes, remember that once you tell your school you want to be entered in the Transfer Portal, they have the right to cancel your scholarship at the end of the semester or quarter, even if you were planning to finish out the current school year.  If you are at a Division I program that hasn’t started classes yet for this year (mostly west coast universities), telling them now that you want to be entered in the Transfer Portal before classes begin could mean that you won’t have your scholarship for this upcoming semester or quarter.

Unlike NCAA Division I athletes, NCAA Division II athletes must receive permission from their current coaching staff and athletic department before coaches at other NCAA colleges can speak with them about a possible transfer.

If your coach tells you to sign a “voluntary withdrawal form” as a condition of obtaining permission to contact other schools, remember that signing that form gives your school the right to immediately cancel your scholarship.

Athletes at NAIA athletic programs do not have to request permission from their current coach or school before they inquire with other schools about a transfer opportunity. HOWEVER, those other schools will be required to inform the athlete’s current school that they have been contacted by that athlete. When that happens, the athlete will probably be removed from their current team immediately.

Do You Need Advice?

We have helped thousands of athletes navigate the transfer process to another college. Schedule a transfer consult online or by calling our office at 913-766-1235.

Student-athletes who are thinking about transferring to another school have many things to consider. Some of these things include when and how to tell the coach and how to find another school.

Here are a few things you should know BEFORE you talk to your coach:

If you’re a current student-athlete on scholarship at an NCAA DI or II school, the one thing you should NOT do is sign a “voluntary withdrawal form.”

Signing a voluntary withdrawal form gives your school the right to immediately cancel your athletic scholarship. This can create all kinds of financial and personal problems that you may not be prepared for.

Another thing to be aware of before talking to the coach is that once you give notice of your intent to transfer to a Division I University, the school is required to place your name and contact info into the NCAA Transfer Portal within 2 business days of your request.

The coach could then tell you to clean out your locker and bar you from the athletic facilities. Click What Happens When an Athlete Files an NCAA Intent to Transfer Notification to read my recent blog about this.

Transferring to another school can result in a fresh start with opportunities to excel both academically and athletically. However, the actual transfer process itself can be very stressful and cause financial and emotional strain.

Over the past 11 years, we’ve helped hundreds of student-athletes successfully navigate the transfer process.

If you’re a student-athlete (or parent of one) who is considering a transfer from your current school, give us a call. In a private Transfer Consult Call, we can guide and advise you through the steps to transfer with the least amount of stress and drama.

Schedule your confidential Transfer Consult online. If you prefer, send an email to rick@informedathlete.com or call us at 913-766-1235 to set your consult.

Last Fall, NCAA Division I changed their transfer procedures.  A DI student-athlete previously had to ask for “permission to transfer” before they were allowed to contact other colleges.

Now, student-athletes can file a written “Intent to Transfer” request.   After an “Intent to Transfer” request is submitted, the school is required to enter their name and contact info in the NCAA Transfer Portal within 2 business days.  Other DI schools can then review and contact the student-athlete.

Many student-athletes are eager to voice their plans to transfer earlier than they otherwise would have in the past.  However, some athletes are experiencing difficulties once they file an intent to transfer notification.  In many cases, they are barred from the locker room and can no longer use the athletic facilities.

Most transfers are stressful and made even worse if not navigated properly.  If you or your athlete is considering a transfer to another school, we can advise, guide, and support you through the process.  Schedule a confidential transfer consult online, by calling us at 913-766-1235 or sending an email to rick@informedathlete.com.