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There continues to be great interest in the discussions of the NCAA Division I Transfer Working Group and whether they will change the rules regarding possible immediate eligibility as a transfer athlete to a Division I university.

Unfortunately, I learned at the recent NCAA Seminar that the Group is finding “…no consensus around a uniform transfer rule.”

Furthermore, “Membership feedback and opinions on the Transfer Working Group itself shows wide range of factors that should inform transfer eligibility.”

In addition, the separate Commission on College Basketball has been asked to provide input to the Transfer Working Group, as has each of the Division I Conferences following their recent Conference meetings.

The NCAA stated in one session that it is “Unlikely the Transfer Working Group will recommend potential solutions prior to the 2018-19 academic year.”

If your athlete is considering a transfer, it’s important that you understand the rules that will apply to their situation. We can help advise and guide you through what is often a very stressful process.  Give us a call at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick @informedathlete.com.

Some NCAA Division I coaches have been denying student-athletes’ permission to talk to other four-year colleges about a possible transfer unless the student-athlete has a GPA of at least 2.600.

This can happen when teams are in danger of being penalized for a low “Academic Progress Rate (APR).”

An NCAA Division I athlete with a 2.500 GPA  could be academically eligible to compete the next season if they were staying at their current school, and could meet the transfer eligibility requirements to be immediately eligible at another 4-year college.

However, that same student-athlete might be denied permission to speak with coaches and athletic staff about a possible transfer to another school simply because their current team could lose an APR retention point.

If you or your student-athlete is considering a transfer to another school and you need help navigating through the process, call Informed Athlete at 913-766-1235 to schedule a consult!

We recently received this e-mail from an athlete:

“I signed an NLI last Fall as a JUCO transfer to a Division II track program, but wasn’t informed until two weeks into this semester that I didn’t meet the academic requirements to be eligible. What options do I have?”  
My first comment is that somebody at that Division II college didn’t do their job as they should have (assuming they received her transcript in a timely manner) if they didn’t inform their athlete of her academic deficiency before the semester started.
Had they done so, she could have at least had the option to go back to the JUCO for one more semester as a full or part-time student, or she could have considered other options.

Now her options are limited and more complicated:

By waiting until two weeks into the semester to inform the athlete of her status, she is stuck at that college and is now ineligible for this academic year.  She must now work to earn her academic eligibility to be able to compete next year at this college.

Also, because an athlete must be academically eligible when they leave their current school in order to be immediately eligible as a transfer to an NCAA member school, she either needs to stay at this school and work to earn her eligibility there, OR
If she chooses to transfer to another NCAA college before she regains eligibility where she is, she will be ineligible for her first academic year at the next college.
Another option is that she could transfer to an NAIA college where it would be possible to regain eligibility after one semester.
How could an athlete AVOID this type of situation?
Make sure you are certified academically eligible by the school you are transferring to before classes begin.
How frequently does this type of thing happen?  
More frequently than you would think.  These are the type of situations I hate because they could easily be prevented.
How can you prevent this from happening to your athlete?

We frequently work with junior college athletes to make sure they’re eligible at their NCAA school of choice by doing a College Transcript Review.  

For more information, contact Informed Athlete at 913-766-1235 or send an email to rick@informedathlete.com.

Are you thinking about a possible transfer from one NCAA or NAIA university to another?

Maybe you’re looking for more playing time elsewhere, or just want to be back closer to home?
If you’re planning to transfer to an NCAA or an NAIA university, you need to remember that you need to receive written permission from your current school to talk with other coaches. So, the first thing you should do is talk to your coach and explain that you would like to request permission to speak with other schools.

But, how do you do that in the middle of your season without being benched or even cut from your team by an angered coach?
We’ve had the privilege of guiding thousands of athletes and parents through the steps in the transfer process, including when and how to approach the coach, and by providing other tips about transfers. We also inform clients of their rights if their transfer request is denied, and how to approach an appeal, if necessary.

A transfer can be a very stressful situation, but in a phone or Skype consultation we’ll guide you through each step in the process so that you’re prepared for the “what ifs.”

To schedule a transfer consultation, please call 913-766-1235 or email rick@informedathlete.com.

We’re sharing a story from an Informed Athlete client.  His story is not an uncommon one; in fact, you might be facing a similar situation.

His story illustrates how easy it is to make mistakes when you don’t know what questions to ask or what things to look for when talking with college coaches or visiting campus.

“Rick Allen and Informed Athlete is an invaluable resource to athletes and their parents for the D1 Baseball recruiting, transferring and signing process.

I only wish that we knew of Rick and his company when our son was in high school going through the recruiting process.  Our son turned down scholarship offers from several schools to play at his “dream school.” 

What we did not know was that D1 baseball only has 11.7 scholarships to give to 27 members of their 35 man baseball roster.  That meant that 8 players on the roster were not “on money.”

We were ignorant and did not know that this meant those players (along with any walk-ons), could be cut from the team after fall practice and not count against the 35 man roster. In other words, the 27 players on money counted against the roster in the Spring so they were very unlikely to get cut no matter what for that year.

Of course, our dream school did not tell us this.  Worse yet, since they had officially recruited my son,  he could not simply  transfer to another D1 school that wanted him without sitting out a year.

Rick Allen guided us through the transfer from his D1 school to a JUCO program and helped us navigate very difficult and confusing rules on how that transfer had to occur if my son was going to transfer back to a D1 program after a year in JUCO. 

Without his help and guidance, I am confident that my son’s career would be in serious jeopardy, if not over completely.  Instead, he is thriving at his new D1 program.

College athletics is BIG BUSINESS that makes BIG MONEY. Do not let your son get caught in a numbers game or be put on the shelf like a commodity until the players in front of him move on. 

Rick Allen can guide you step by step on every decision so you are armed with the knowledge to ask the right questions of your recruiting coach and program.

Do not risk your son’s career or trust that D1 programs have his best interest in mind.  It’s all about the money, so get informed today by the best in the business. 

Thank you Rick!!!!!   Finally, someone with knowledge that we could trust and rely upon for the advice we needed.”